Sunday, January 30, 2011

Identify the Technique


Please, somebody help me. What is this applique/embroidery technique called?

It seems to have been a popular form in the mid-20th century. I have a number of vintage tray cloths and teatowels with similar floral motifs.

I can't find it in any of my books or online, although that's probably because it's hard to search for something for which you don't have a name. The fabrics seem to have shading pre-printed, and applique shapes are stitched down with a tiny blanket stitch. Thanks for any clues my dear readers may be able to give.

My current quilt project is pictured above. Definitely not my usual style - I was given a number of vintage hand embroidered linen squares and have put them into a quilt for a community fundraiser. I tried to cut the sweetness with the dusty green edging. It will have a scalloped linen border - something I haven't done before so it will be fun to take on a challenge.

10 comments:

  1. this post makes me even more keen to find a search engine site where you can upload an image and search for it. would be great for identifying bugs and nature stuff! people are contacting me about the swap!!!

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  2. I am not completely sure if I can identify from the pictures, what is special for that technique... Are those aplique motives worked separately and then stitched to the fabric only in the middle? Kind of 3D applique?

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  3. The fabric pieces are all cut out separately and then appliqued to the fabric, but as in the bottom example, sometimes the petals and/or leaves will be layered. They are 2D.

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  4. i am not sure it has a name. i have tons of hankies like this, but there is an elderly woman in the neighborhood who does this, i will ask.

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  5. You could ask this lady here: http://italian-needlework.blogspot.com
    Janine lives in Canada and is a true expert of historic embroidery.
    I am sure that if you leave a message on her blog she will get in touch with you.

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  6. Thanks Aracne! I will check it out.

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  7. is it trapunto? or something like trapunto?

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  8. I have to come back and see if you got the answer for the pieces. I'm certain that they are early Chinese applique, but sorry I don't know what they called them.

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  9. I think you are right Nat. I can't find out if there is a special name for the technique, but the first two pictures are from my Aunt Margie, whose husband imported things from China in the 1940's, and I think they date from that time.

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  10. I will take some of my pieces to show my Chinese friend. She is a scholar. She might find out for us...

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